Publications: Social Status

In Press »

Tracy, J. L., Steckler, C., Randles, D., & Mercadante, E. (in press).

The financial cost of status signaling: Expansive postural displays are associated with a reduction in the receipt of altruistic donations.

Evolution and Human Behavior

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2018 »

2016 »

Tracy, J. L. (2016).

Outrageousness is Trump's trump card.

USA Today

Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., Ho, S., & Henrich, J. (2016).

Listen, follow me: Dynamics vocal signals of dominance predict emergent social rank in humans.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 145, 536-547.

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2014 »

Tracy, J. L., Weidman, A. C., Cheng, J. T., & Martens, J. P. (2014).

Pride: The fundamental emotion of success, power, and status.

In Tugade, Shiota, & Kirby (Eds.), Handbook of positive emotion (pp. 294-310). New York: Guildford Press.

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Cheng, J. T., Weidman, A. C., & Tracy, J. L. (2014).

The assessment of social status: A review of measures and experimental manipulations

In Cheng, Tracy, & Anderson (Eds.), The Psychology of Social Status (pp. 347-362). New York: Springer.

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Steckler, C. M., & Tracy, J. L. (2014).

The Emotional Underpinnings of Social Status

In Cheng, Tracy, & Anderson (Eds.), The Psychology of Social Status (pp. 201-224). New York: Springer.

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Cheng, J. T., & Tracy, J. L. (2014).

Toward a Unified Science of Hierarchy: Dominance and Prestige are Two Fundamental Pathways to Human Social Rank.

In Cheng, Tracy, & Anderson (Eds.), The Psychology of Social Status (pp. 3-27). New York: Springer.

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2013 »

Tracy, J. L. (2013).

Pride: It brings out the best--and worst--in humans.

Scientific American Mind

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Martens, J. P., & Tracy, J. L.. (2013).

The emotional origins of a social learning bias: Does the pride expression cue copying?

Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, 492-499.

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Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., Foulsham, T., & Kingstone, A., & Henrich, J. (2013).

Two ways to the top: Evidence that dominance and prestige are distinct yet viable avenues to social rank and influence

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 103–125.

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Cheng, J. T., & Tracy, J. L. (2013).

The impact of wealth on prestige and dominance rank relationships.

Psychological Inquiry, 24, 102-108.

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Tracy, J. L., Shariff, A. F., Zhao, W., & Henrich, J. (2013).

Cross-Cultural Evidence that the Nonverbal Expression of Pride is an Automatic Status Signal

Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142, 163-180.

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2012 »

Martens, J. P., Tracy, J. L., & Shariff, A. F. (2012).

Status signals: Adaptive benefits of displaying and observing the nonverbal expressions of pride and shame.

Cognition and Emotion, 26, 390-406.

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Shariff, A. F., Tracy, J. L., & Markusoff, J. (2012).

(Implicitly) Judging a Book By Its Cover: The Power of Pride and Shame Expressions in Shaping Judgments of Social Status

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 1178-1193.

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2011 »

Tracy, J. L. (2011).

Emotions of inequality [Review of S. Fiske, “Envy up, scorn down: How status divides us”]

Science

(Summary) (Full Text)

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2010 »

Tracy, J. L., Shariff, A. F., & Cheng, J. T. (2010).

A naturalist’s view of pride.

Emotion Review, 2, 163-177 [target article]

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Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., & Henrich, J. (2010).

Pride, Personality, and the Evolutionary Foundations of Human Social Status.

Evolution and Human Behavior, 31, 334-347.

(Supplementary Material)

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Foulsham, T., Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., Henrich, J., & Kingstone, A. (2010).

Gaze allocation in a dynamic situation: Effects of social status and speaking.

Cognition, 117, 319-331.

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2009 »

Shariff, A. F., & Tracy, J. L. (2009).

Knowing who’s boss: Implicit perceptions of status from the nonverbal expression of pride.

Emotion, 9, 631-639

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2007 »

Tracy, J. L., & Robins, R. W. (2007).

Emerging insights into the nature and function of pride.

Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16, 147-150.

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