Media: Pride

2018 »

Do you discourage your kid from being prideful? Research shows that might not be the way to go.

...Parents know that grit and inner motivation are building blocks to success, yet they sometimes struggle with how to instill these qualities in their children. Recent research finds they have a surprising — and often overlooked — key ingredient: pride....

Read the full article in the Washington Post

Power posing might make people less willing to help you when asking for charitable donations

So-called “power posing” could backfire if you’re seeking a donation. New research in Evolution and Human Behavior indicates that expansive postural displays — like standing up straight with your shoulders pushed back — can dissuade charitable giving.

“We have studied nonverbal displays of pride and high rank in my lab for some time now (for example, see herehere, and here) and this is a topic covered heavily in my book, Pride: The Secret of Success,” said study author Jessica L. Tracy, a psychology professor at the University of British Columbia....

>> Read the full article in PsyPost here.

Why We Shouldn't Be Too Modest

Pride is the downfall of many a tragic hero. Mr Darcy has to let his go before he can earn Elizabeth Bennet’s love. Dante listed it as one of the seven deadly sins. And as the famous (and oft-misquoted) verse from Proverbs cautions us, it “goeth before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall”.

There’s no question about it: we’re consistently told that pride makes us obnoxious at best and doomed at worst.

But pride may not entirely deserve this reputation as a destructive force. There’s new evidence that this emotion has an evolutionary function, and that it plays an important role in the way that we interact with the world....

Read the full article in BBC Future here >>

2019 »

PRIDE: STRENGTH OR SIN? THE IMPACT OF NONVERBAL DISPLAYS OF PRIDE ON HIRING DECISIONS

Picture this. You’re sitting in a job interview talking to someone who will help determine whether or not you get the job. They start asking you about something on your resume – a project you’re particularly proud of, one that you worked really hard on. You can’t help it: you start to lift your head a little higher, sit up straight, pull back your shoulders, puff out your chest. But will this nonverbal display of pride actually help you get the job?

It might. At the University of British Columbia’s Emotion & Self LabJessica Tracy studies nonverbal expressions of pride. Her research shows that displays of pride like these automatically communicate high status, and being perceived as high status by your interviewer could certainly help you get the job.

For the full article on the SPSP Newsletter, click here >>

2012 »

Ashton-James & Tracy (2012)

Pride and Prejudice: Feelings about the self influence judgments of others.

Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 466-476.

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2008 »

Tracy & Matsumoto (2008)

The spontaneous display of pride and shame: Evidence for biologically innate nonverbal displays.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105, 11655-11660.

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2011 »

Tracy and colleagues.

Coverage of our research on pride (2004-2011)

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2007 »

Tracy & Robins (2004; 2007)

Show Your Pride & Emerging Insights into the Nature and Function of Pride (2004; 2007)

Psychological Science and Current Directions in Psychological Science

[Click here or here for actual papers.]

 

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2013 »

Cheng, Tracy, Foulsham, Kingstone, & Henrich (2013).

Two ways to the top: Evidence that dominance and prestige are distinct yet viable avenues to social rank and influence

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 103–125.

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